Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Waves of Grain


Well, if a 12X40 plot can be considered Waves.



I can't do a Sheep to Shawl project just yet...the barnyard is still empty (someday, someday), so the next best thing is Seed to Bread.




I have planted both Kamut and Spring Hard Red Wheat just as a test.

Both are thriving.

 .



I am getting excited to have my own flour to bake with.

Next up, the purchase of a grain mill.
I had no idea there would be so many choices.
Perhaps you bloggers have some suggestions.

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Sharing with

Homestead Revival's Barn Hop

and


Enjoying the party with Nancy and Lisa at

Rural Thursday Blog Hop




16 comments:

Lynne said...

Will the little one help you bake!

Kathryn Ray said...

Oh wow, that's exciting!

I'm definitely looking forward to seeing how this project goes.

We are safe with the fires. The closest is the High Park Fire just west of Fort Collins. It's about 15 miles away and moving generally away from us.

TexWisGirl said...

that's kind of exciting!

Sue said...

That's neat, your own grain, look forward to seeing the results. What kind of yield can you expect from what you've sown?

Meg said...

That is just amazing you are growing your own wheat! One of these days I hope we have enough land to try it. Keep us up to date on how it goes! (Alas, I have no idea what kind of mill to get.)

Nancy Claeys said...

That's exciting! I'm glad your crops are doing well. :)

Buttons said...

Love the photos. Congratualations on you own grain. To bad you were not at the auction I was at last week they sold a very nice grain mill. Good luck. B

Lisa @ Two Bears Farm said...

Your crop looks great! I don't have a grain mill, but I'm sure someone will have some suggestions.

ArtMuseDog and Carol said...

Glad your crops are doing great and you get to make your very own bread ~ Very ambitious ~~ thanks, ^_^ (A Creative Harbor)

Hanne Bente said...

Great pictures you show. Wishing you a good day :) Hanne Bente

Tanya said...

oh that will be a fun adventure and your little helper is too cute!

Tricia Hays said...

You're going to buy a grain mill? Oh my goodness, that's awesome! Lots & lots of pics, can't wait!

Thank you so much for the comment you left about my flower postcard, that was so sweet! =)

joanne said...

Well, they do wave don't they? What an adventurous type to plant grain - pretty cool, and nice pics too

Mary said...

I make whole grain bread, but you make whole grain! I am your newest follower. Please come visit me. Mary

LouAnne said...

If you want an electric mill then I'd say the Nutrimill or WonderMill should be your pick. Nutrimill is nice because it has a large hopper and can be turned off during milling. The WonderMill is a remake of the old WhisperMill, also a good machine but smaller amounts can be ground at one time and cannot be turned off during milling. The Family Grain Mill is a fabulous hand mill and it can also be motorized. You can get the package that also includes the flaker which is wonderful for making your own wheat flakes or for flaking oat groats. I've owned all three of these mills for many, many years and of all the mills I've tried out over the years these are hands down the best.

Brandislee said...

I actually have a Family Grain mill with the attachment for my Kitchenaid. If you already have a stand mixer (Kitchenaid or Bosch... although if you have the very basic Kitchenaid it's not recommended, you should only use a grain mill with the 325 watt mixer or better) it's a good option. The grind isn't quite as fine, but it takes up less space and cost less. Plus there's an optional hand crank, and it makes me feel better knowing that if we're without electricity for some reason I can still grind wheat and bake bread (we have a wood stove...). I've been using mine for almost three years now, most of the time 1-2 times a week, and it hasn't missed a beat. It's also worth noting that you can only grind about 7 cups of wheat at a time, then you have to wait an hour for the mixer to cool down, so it's not a great option if you want to grind a lot at once. I typically grind a hopper full (7 cups), mix a batch of bread dough, and later in the day grind a second batch of flour for use during the week. It just takes a little planning.